Teaching

Online Courses

Fantasy Literature: Tales Before and After Tolkien

Fantasy courseThis accredited course (Year 3, undergraduate) explores the fascinating world of fantasy literature, from Victorian fairy tales to modern imaginary worlds.Some of the key texts we will explore include J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, C.S. Lewis’s Narnia books, Ursula Le Guin’s Earthsea series, Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy and J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series.

The course is open to students and adult learners all over the world. It is delivered entirely online via Blackboard, Cardiff Met’s Virtual Learning Environment.

  • For more information about this course please visit this link.
  • If you want to receive updates on upcoming dates for this course please click on Contact and leave your e-mail address and the message “online courses mailing list”
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J.R.R. Tolkien: Myth and Middle-earth in Context

TolkienOnlineCourse123This accredited course (Masters Level) examine the J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendarium, from his much-loved The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, to his extended mythology most commonly known from the published Silmarillion. We will explore Tolkien’s early project for a “mythology for England” and trace his inspiration and creative re-working of myth and folklore (including Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, Celtic, Arthurian and Classical material) and the literary tradition (from Shakespeare to Victorian and Edwardian literature). We will look at Tolkien’s invented languages and alphabets as an integral part of his mythology; discuss Tolkien’s portrayal of the “races” and cultures of Middle-earth, and end with a consideration of Tolkien’s continuing influence on popular culture, including Peter Jackson’s film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings.

The course is open to students and adult learners all over the world. It is delivered entirely online via Blackboard, Cardiff Met’s Virtual Learning Environment.

  • For more information about this course please visit this link or watch the vide presentation below
  • If you want to receive updates on upcoming dates for this course please click on Contact and leave your e-mail address and the message “online courses mailing list”
  • You can also follows us on facebook and Twitter.

Undergraduate and Postgraduate Modules

Introduction to Poetry (Year 1, undergraduate)

This module explores and discusses a range of poems written in different periods, from Rennaisance Britain to contemporary America. The module concentrates on figurative language, music and sound and poetic tone. The module also explores a wide range of poetic forms, from sonnets to free verse, and different themes in poetry, including myth, identity and art.

Literary Transformations (Year 2, undergraduate)

This modules explores ‘founding narratives’ from myth, legend and folklore, and their transformations in modern literature and popular culture. We begin with the figure of the vampire, from Eastern European folklore, to Bram Stoker’s Dracula, all the way to modern interpretations such as Anne Rice’s Interview with the Vampire, and HBO’s True Blood. We then go back to Classical times and examine two tales from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, the stories of Orpheus and Pygmalion, and trace their use as tropes in a series of literary and cinematic interpretations.

Gothic and Science Fiction (Year 3, undergraduate)

I am responsible for the second part of this module (Term 2) which focuses on Science Fiction. We explore the evolution of this genre from the 19th century and the foundations of classic science fiction (H.G. Wells, Asimov, etc) to the rebellious 1960s (Philip K. Dick and Ursula K. Le Guin) and more recent cinematic and TV texts including Blade Runner and Battlestar Galactica.

Representing ‘the Past’ (MA)

This module considers how we interpret ‘the past’ within a cultural context. Looking at both textual and extra-textual appropriations, and by showing how meanings of ‘the past’ are contested at any one time, the module considers how certain interpretations are naturalised and legitimated within culture. Themes include Romantic Nationalism, the ‘invention of tradition’ and Medievalism.

Previous Courses designed and taught

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