Tolkien Sessions at IMC Leeds, July 2018

Tolkien Sessions at IMC Leeds, July 2018

I am very pleased to announce that all six sessions on J.R.R. Tolkien I proposed for the International Medieval Congress at Leeds 2018 have been accepted! This will be the fourth consecutive year of papers on J.R.R. Tolkien at IMC Leeds, after a successful series of sessions in 20152016 and 2017. Leeds is, of course, a Tolkien-related location, and it is very fitting that his work will be once again explored in this prestigious conference. Many thanks to Professor Thomas Honegger for his help with the IMC 2018 organizing. I am looking forward to a series of brilliant sessions and papers from well-established Tolkien scholars, alongside new voices and perspectives!

 

Here are the sessions titles, abstracts, papers, speakers and times:

 

Session 127
Title: Memory in Tolkien’s Medievalism, I
Session Time: Mon. 02 July – 11.15-12.45

Sponsor: Cardiff Metropolitan University
Organiser: Dimitra Fimi, Department of Humanities, Cardiff Metropolitan University
Moderator/Chair: Anna Smol, Department of English, Mount Saint Vincent University, Nova Scotia

Memory, Lore, Knowledge in Tolkien’s Legendarium
Thomas Honegger, Institut für Anglistik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

World-Building and Memory in The Name-List to the ‘Fall of Gondolin’
Andrew Higgins, Independent Scholar, Brighton

The Smith, the Weaver and the Librarian: Sub-Creating Memory in Tolkien’s work
Gaëlle Abaléa, Centre d’Etudes Médiévales Anglaises (CEMA), Université Paris IV – Sorbonne

Tolkien’s Typological Imagination
Anna Smol, Department of English, Mount Saint Vincent University, Nova Scotia

 

Session 227
Title: Memory in Tolkien’s Medievalism, II
Session Time: Mon. 02 July – 14.15-15.45

Sponsor: Cardiff Metropolitan University
Organiser: Dimitra Fimi, Department of Humanities, Cardiff Metropolitan University
Moderator/Chair: Andrew Higgins, Independent Scholar, Brighton

Tolkien Remembering Tolkien: Textual Memory in the 1977 Silmarillion
Gergely Nagy, Independent Scholar, Budapest

Remembering and Forgetting: National Identity Construction in Tolkien’s Middle-Earth
Sara Brown, Independent Scholar, Conwy

Longing to Remember, Dying to Forget: Memory and Monstrosity
Penelope Holdaway, Department of Humanities, Cardiff Metropolitan University

‘Forgot even the stones’: Stone Monuments and Imperfect Cultural and Personal Memories in The Lord of the Rings
Kristine Larsen, Department of Geological Sciences, Central Connecticut State University

 

Session 311
Title: ‘New’ Tolkien: Expanding the Canon
Session Time: Mon. 02 July – 16.30-18.00
Sponsor: Cardiff Metropolitan University
Organiser: Dimitra Fimi, Department of Humanities, Cardiff Metropolitan University
Moderator/Chair: Dimitra Fimi

‘I will give you a name’: Sentient Objects in Tolkien’s Fiction
Patrick Pazdziora, College of Liberal Arts, Shantou University, China

Tolkien’s ‘The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun’ and The Lay of Leithian
Yvette Kisor, School of American & International Studies, Ramapo College of New Jersey

Invented Language and Invented Religion: Tolkien’s Innovative Symbolic Systems and New Religious Movements
Nathan Fredrickson, Department of Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

The Grammar of Historical Memory in Tolkien’s Legendarium: The Tale of Beren and Lúthien
Christian F. Hempelmann and Robin Anne Reid, Department of Literature & Languages, Texas A&M University, Commerce

 

Session 749
Title: Tolkien: Medieval Roots and Modern Branches, I
Session Time: Tue. 03 July – 14.15-15.45

Sponsor: Cardiff Metropolitan University
Organiser: Thomas Honegger, Institut für Anglistik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Moderator/Chair: Brad Eden, Christopher Center for Library & Information Resources, Valparaiso University, Indiana

Some Boethian Themes as Tools of Characterization in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings
Andrzej Wicher, Zakład Dramatu i Dawnej Literatury Angielskiej, Uniwersytet Łódzki

Eldest: Tom Bombadil and Fintan Mac Bóchra
Kris Swank, Northwest Campus Library, Pima Community College, Arizona

Under the Wings of Shadow: Mental Health and the Price of Civilization in The Lord of the Rings
Hilary Justice, Ernest Hemingway Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library, Boston, Massachusetts

Hobbits: The Un-Recorded People of Middle-Earth
Aurélie Brémont, Centre d’Études Médiévales Anglaises (CEMA), Université Paris IV – Sorbonne

 

Session 849
Title: Tolkien: Medieval Roots and Modern Branches, II
Session Time: Tue. 03 July – 16.30-18.00

Sponsor: Cardiff Metropolitan University
Organiser: Thomas Honegger, Institut für Anglistik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Moderator/Chair: Thomas Honegger

Longing for Death: Tolkien and Sehnsucht
Anna Vaninskaya, School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures, University of Edinburgh

Tolkien’s Agrarianism in its Time
Joshua Richards, Faculty of English, Williams Baptist College, Arkansas

Frodo Surrealist: André Breton and J. R. R. Tolkien on Dreams
Claudio Antonio Testi, Independent Scholar, Modena

A Man of His Time?: Tolkien and the Edwardian Worldview
Brad Eden, Christopher Center for Library & Information Resources, Valparaiso University, Indiana

 

Session 949
Title: Tolkien in Context(s): A Round Table Discussion
Session Time: Tue. 03 July – 19.00-20.00

Sponsor: Cardiff Metropolitan University
Organiser: Dimitra Fimi, Department of Humanities, Cardiff Metropolitan University
Moderator/Chair: Dimitra Fimi

Participants:

Yvette Kisor, School of American & International Studies, Ramapo College of New Jersey

Kristine Larsen, Department of Geological Sciences, Central Connecticut State University

Irina Metzler, College of Arts & Humanities, Swansea University

Gergely Nagy, Independent Scholar, Budapest

Sara L. Uckelman, Institute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University

 

Celtic Myth in Contemporary Children’s Fantasy announced as runner-up for Katharine Briggs Folklore Award

Last Wednesday I traveled to London for the Katharine Briggs Lecture 2017, and the announcement of the Katharine Briggs Folklore Award. My new monograph, Celtic Myth in Contemporary Children’s Fantasy, had been shortlisted for this prestigious international award, previously won by such giants in the field as Marina Warner, Jack Zipes, and Hilda Ellis Davidson.

The lecture, titled “Hallowe’en and Valentine: The Culture of Saints’ Days in the English-Speaking World”, was given by the brilliant Professor Nick Groom (University of Exeter). Professor Groom argued for the influence of printed literature on the shaping (or reshaping) of folklore (from Shakespeare to the 18th century) and a lively discussion followed.

When the awards were announced after the lecture, I was absolutely delighted to find out that my book was the runner-up for the Katharine Briggs Folklore Award! The worthy winner was Christopher Josiffe, for his Gef! The Strange Tale of an Extra-Special Talking Mongoose (Strange Attractor Press, 2017). Given that there were nine shortlisted books, some of them by scholars I have been admiring and following for years, I was really proud that my book was the runner-up! And it was so nice to see so many colleagues and friends at the lecture and the reception that followed!

Many thanks to the judges and the Folklore Society!

Here is the shortlist in full:

  • Bronner, Simon. Folklore: The Basics (Routledge, 2017)
  • Constantine, Mary-Ann, and Éva Guillorel. Miracles & Murders: An Introductory Anthology of Breton Ballads (Oxford University Press, 2017)
  • Davies, Owen, ed. The Oxford Illustrated History of Witchcraft & Magic (Oxford University Press, 2017)
  • Dillion, Jacqueline. Thomas Hardy: Folklore and Resistance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)
  • Fimi, Dimitra. Celtic Myth in Contemporary Children’s Fantasy: Idealization, Identity, Ideology (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)
  • Hannant, Sara, and Simon Costin. Of Shadows: One Hundred Objects from the Museum of Witchcraft and Magic (Strange Attractor Press, 2016)
  • Heaney, Michael, ed. Percy Manning: The Man Who Collected Oxfordshire (Archaeopress Publishing, 2017)
  • Josiffe, Christopher. Gef! The Strange Tale of an Extra-Special Talking Mongoose (Strange Attractor Press, 2017)
  • Williams, Kelsey Jackson. The Antiquary: John Aubrey’s Historical Scholarship (Oxford University Press, 2016)

And here is a news story my university (Cardiff Metropolitan University) shared when my book was shortlisted: Literary nods for Cardiff Met fantasy and folklore academic

Philip Pullman in Cardiff: La Belle Sauvage, Lyra’s world, and the writer’s craft

This afternoon I was fortunate to attend a brilliant event organised by Waterstones and Literature Wales. Following the publication of La Belle Sauvage on Thursday, Philip Pullman visited Cardiff to talk about the new book and his creative process more generally. The event was held at the BBC Hoddinott Hall, Wales Millennium Centre, and the room was full to capacity.

During the first part Pullman answered questions posed by Horatio Clare, and also read to us two extracts from La Belle Sauvage. Then the audience has a chance to ask further questions.

Pullman talked about the characters of La Belle Sauvage, the world of Lyra, children’s literature, folklore, and the craft of writing more generally. Here is my Twitter thread with quotations and comments from Pullman during the Q&A:

 

Many congratulations to Waterstones and Literature Wales for a wonderful event!